VSL

The new bridges have a 19.9 meter-high clearance over the 38.1 meter-wide channel and each is approximately 918 meters in length.
The new bridges have a 19.9 meter-high clearance over the 38.1 meter-wide channel and each is approximately 918 meters in length.
Broadway Bridge
Daytona Beach, Florida

The Broadway Bridge, which spans the Intracoastal Waterway, provides the primary access to Daytona Beach, Florida. Construction of the bridge, which replaced a now demolished four-lane bascule bridge, began in January 1999.

The main superstructure consists of precast segments erected in cantilever. There are 13 spans (consisting of predominantly 80m spans) totaling approximately 820 meters in length. The segments were constructed at a casting yard in Flagler Beach, Florida and then transported via barge to the jobsite for erection 25 miles down the waterway. The longest span is 80.5 meters. The Eastbound and Westbound roadways are each atop a 14.7 meter wide concrete box girder.

The longitudinal post-tensioning systems utilized on the project are the VSL ES5-12, ES5-19 and ES5-31 multistand anchorages. Each tendon consists of multiple 0.5” diameter “special” strand. The use of “special” strand, which has a slightly larger area than standard 0.5” diameter strand, allowed for the efficient use of the anchorage systems. The transverse systems within the bridge deck consist of VSL’s SA6-4 Anchorage and VSL PT+ duct. The bridge contains approximately 690 tons of 0.5” diameter special post-tensioning strand and 150 tons of 0.6” diameter standard post-tensioning strand. In addition to the main segmental structure, there is also a post-tensioned flat slab approach.

As part of the new grouting specifications instituted by the Florida DOT to ensure protection of the post-tensioning tendons, VSL provided high shear grouting equipment and permanent grout caps. The 918m precast variable depth segmental bridge was dedicated on July 20, 2001.


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